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Online Wellness Community Natural Health and Anti-Aging News
Online Wellness Community Natural Health and Anti-Aging News
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Amino Acids

If you are not yet aware of how important amino acids are and the potential benefits from amino acids supplementation, read on. Here is everything you should know, at a minimum, about amino acids. Review our summary page on amino acids, then come back here for a more in depth discussion.

Recognized ESSENTIAL amino acids:

  • Phenylalanine (used by the brain to produce Norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter chemical that transmits signals between nerve cells in the brain; keeps you awake & alert; reduces hunger pains; functions as an antidepressant and helps improve memory)
  • Leucine (provides ingredients for the manufacturing of other essential biochemical components in the body, some of which are utilized for the production of energy as stimulants to the upper brain to help with increased alertness)
  • Lysine (ensures the adequate absorption of calcium; helps form collagen (bone cartilage & connective tissues); aids in the production of antibodies, hormones & enzymes; may be effective against herpes by reducing viral growth. Deficiencies may cause exhaustion, inability to concentrate, irritability, retard growth, hair loss, anemia & reproductive problems)
  • Isoleucine (provides ingredients for the manufacturing of other essential biochemical components in the body, some of which are utilized for the production of energy as stimulants to the upper brain to help with increased alertness)
  • Threonine (an important constituent of collagen, elastin, and enamel protein; helps prevent fatty build-up in the liver; helps the digestive and intestinal tracts function more smoothly; assists metabolism and assimilation)
  • Serine (brain tissues are especially rich in serine; declines in serine with aging impacts learning, memory, and alertness;  serine supports nerve tissue; aids proper release and reception of neurotransmitters in the brain improving neural function; enhances energy metabolism in all cells)
  • Tryptophan (Used by the brain to make serotonin, an important neurotransmitter responsible for anti-depression and feelings of well-being. Brain serotonin is often depleted as we age leading to depression)
  • Methionine (helps prevent disorders of the hair, skin and nails; helps lower cholesterol levels by increasing the liver’s production of lecithin; reduces liver fat and protects the kidneys; is a natural chelating agent for heavy metals and body detoxification; helps regulates the formation of ammonia and creates ammonia-free urine which reduces bladder irritation; and may promote hair growth)
  • Histidine is sometimes considered an essential amino acid for children and infants only.

Recognized NON-ESSENTIAL amino acids:

  • Arginine (Arginine is an amino acid that helps reduce the risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. Arginine is also vital for the production of protein and can help boost the immune system)
  • Glycine (Helps trigger the release of oxygen to the energy-requiring, cell-making process; it is important in the manufacturing of hormones responsible for a strong immune system)
  • Valine (is by many considered an essential amino acid that is also a branched-chain amino acid (the others are isoleucine and leucine) found in high concentration in the muscles needed for muscle metabolism, repair and growth of tissue)
  • Glutamine
  • Alanine
  • Cysteine
  • Ornitine
  • Carnosine
  • Carnitine (a free amino acid shown to help fatigue, brain, heart, mood, sexual performance, and dealing with and recovery from cancer, heart attack, HIV, MS and more)

For information on the pros and cons of plant verses animal protein sources – part of the “To Be Or Not To Be Vegan” controversy - CLICK HERE.

neurotransmitters Amino Acids

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